Research Publications

Public Attitude Monitor 2006, Issue 1

Insurance Research Council’s Public Attitude Monitor 2006 (PAM) examines the public's perception of vulnerability to natural disasters, actions taken to prepare for the aftermath of disasters, opinions regarding building codes and subsidization of insurance costs, and other issues. Findings show that many Americans believe that a natural disaster is likely to cause harm or property damage to their households sometime in the next five years. The report also indicates that most Americans support the adoption and enforcement of building codes to make new homes stronger and safer. Most Americans do not support government subsidization of insurance costs and do not support subsidization of the cost of insurance in high risk areas by policyholders in low risk areas.

Uninsured Motorists 2006

This study examines trends in the percentage of uninsured motorists in each state based on uninsured motorists and bodily injury claim frequencies from 1999 to 2004. City-level data were also analyzed in six states.

Fraud and Buildup in New York Auto Injury Insurance Claims

This IRC study examines regional differences in New York’s auto injury claims using data from 2002 and prior years. The study shows several aspects of claiming behavior in which New York City area claimants were different from upstate claimants, including frequencies of the presence of fraud and buildup indicators.

Fraud and Buildup in New York Auto Injury Insurance Claims

This IRC study examines regional differences in New York’s auto injury claims using data from 2002 and prior years. The study shows several aspects of claiming behavior in which New York City area claimants were different from upstate claimants, including frequencies of the presence of fraud and buildup indicators.

Public Attitude Monitor 2005 - Issue 2

This second issue of the Insurance Research Council’s Public Attitude Monitor 2005 (PAM) examines the public's understanding of the relationship between a deductible and premium. Findings show that more than four in ten Americans who have a homeowners policy do not understand one of the fundamental principles of insurance, specifically that when a deductible increases the amount of the premium decreases. The report also indicates that most Americans find it easy to obtain homeowners insurance that meets their needs and is affordable. Filing a claim within the past five years has a small to negligible effect on the percentage of homeowners who find it easy to obtain insurance.

Fraud and Buildup in California Auto Injury Insurance Claims

As part of the IRC’s 2002 auto injury study, file reviewers assessed claims for the presence of indicators of fraud and buildup. This report examines the prevalence of these indicators among California auto injury claims compared to national patterns. Also, fraud and buildup patterns in Los Angeles are compared to those found in the rest of the state.

Analysis of Auto Injury Insurance Claims From Two Choice States

The third report in an IRC series focusing on auto injury claims in states with similar insurance regulations, this report analyzes BI and PIP claims in two choice states: New Jersey and Pennsylvania. The analysis of injury claims uncovers differences between the two states and also shows differences within each state based on claimants’ choice of no-fault or full tort insurance.

Public Attitude Monitor 2005 - Issue 1

This first issue of the Insurance Research Council’s Public Attitude Monitor 2005 (PAM) examines public perceptions of the profitability of homeowners insurance. Findings show that the public substantially overestimates insurers’ profits and underestimates the cost of paying claims. The public’s estimates are remarkably consistent across subgroups and geographic areas and have not changed since last assessed in 1998.

Analysis of Auto Injury Insurance Claims From Four Tort State

Auto injury claimants from four states seek different types of medical treatment, even though they report similar injuries. A new study of insurance claims by the Insurance Research Council (IRC) examined auto injury claiming behavior in California, Illinois, Texas, and Washington. Comparing auto injury claims from these four tort states, IRC finds that California claimants go to chiropractors most often, Illinois claimants are most likely to see an emergency room physician, and Washington claimants are most likely to go to general practitioners, as well as alternative medical providers, such as massage therapists. From 1997 to 2002, per-claimant medical expenses increased the most in Texas, compared with the other three states.

Trends in Auto Injury Claims, 2004 Edition

This report documents changes in auto accident and injury claim rates for the nation and each state from 1980 through 2003 under separate auto insurance coverages. The study also examines total injury claim costs for the country and each state from 1987 through 2001.